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259961 records – page 1 of 12999.

Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Copy of a photograph of an unidentified child sitting on a chair with tassels. The girl is wearing a dark coloured dress with stripes at the bottom of the skirt, at the wrists, and along the neckline. There is a large curtain draped on the left. The dress she is wearing is catalogued 1989-029-0001.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1989-029-0002
Length
6.4
Height
10.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
McFarland
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
McFarland
Artist Notes
Star Gallery, Tarkio, MO.
Description
Photograph of an unidentified young girl wearing a dress with a tie at the collar and a bow in her hair. Her arm is resting on a rock-like landscape.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0092
Length
10.7
Height
16.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Holler
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Holler
Artist Notes
San Francisco
Description
Photograph of an unidentified young girl sitting on a chair that has been draped with lace. The girl is wearing a black dress with large shoulders and dark button-up boots. Her arm is on the arm of the chair and her head is resting on her fist.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0096
Length
10.8
Height
16.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Carte-de-visite photograph of an unidentified young boy weairng a suit and boutonniere. Cartes-de-visite, or “visiting card” was the most popular form of 19th century photography. It was patented by Parisian photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri (1819-1889) in 1854. Carte-de-visite were typically made of an albumen print, which was a thin paper photograph mounted on a thicker paper card. The craze reached England around 1857, and unlike earlier forms of photography, reached almost every level of society.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0061
Length
6.2
Height
10.2
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Hamilton
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Hamilton
Artist Notes
William Street, Buffalo, NY
Description
Photograph of an unidentified young boy wearing dark coloured clothing with a large white collar. The boy is wearing a large locket around his neck and is sitting on a chair with a blanket with tassels draped over it.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0091
Length
10.8
Height
16.4
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Warning: Sensitive Content Photograph of an unidentified baby in a casket. This photograph is an example of post mortem photography. Post-mortem photography was relatively common during the Victorian era. Photography was not very accessible to the average person, so if a loved one died it might have been their only opportunity to have a photograph taken to remember them by. The deceased was often positioned in a natural or “sleeping” position. It was often also common to show them in sitting positions to appear more life-like. Often the mother would be pictured holding the deceased child, and sometimes siblings would also be included. In the Victorian era it was natural to have post-mortem photographs or memorial art work included in all rooms of the house.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1996-022-0001
Length
6.4
Height
10.2
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Warning: Sensitive Content Photograph of an unidentified young girl. This photograph is an example of post mortem photography. Post-mortem photography was relatively common during the Victorian era. Photography was not very accessible to the average person, so if a loved one died it might have been their only opportunity to have a photograph taken to remember them by. The deceased was often positioned in a natural or “sleeping” position. It was often also common to show them in sitting positions to appear more life-like. Often the mother would be pictured holding the deceased child, and sometimes siblings would also be included. In the Victorian era it was natural to have post-mortem photographs or memorial art work included in all rooms of the house.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth Tragic Events
Accession Number
1996-022-0002
Length
6.5
Height
10
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
E.S. Hadcock
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
E.S. Hadcock
Artist Notes
The photograph was taken by E.S. Hadcock. Edward S. Hadcock operated in Aylmer between 1882 and 1886. At the bottom of the photograph on the matting is, "E.S. Hadcock Photographer"
Description
Photograph of an unidentified baby wearing a white dress. Originally located with an envelope with "Mrs. R. Ackert" written on it, however the identity of the baby is unknown. Taken by E.S. Hadcock.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Accession Number
2001-006-0017
Length
6.4
Height
10
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1857
Date Range To
1900
Material
iron
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Tintype photograph of four children, three girls and one boy. The boy is wearing a suit and has a pocket watch. The girls are wearing dresses and necklaces. The girl seated on the right is wearing button-up boots. In the background is an image of a house. Victorian-era photography studios often featured hand-painted backdrops with architectural features including ornate staircases, columns, and pillars. Nature scenes were also popular. Hand-painted scenic backdrops were popular in portrait photography studios from the 1860s until the 1920s. Tintypes were introduced in the mid 1850s and remained popular into the early 1900s. The process was first described in 1853 by Adolphe-Alexandre Martin, and was later patented in 1857 by Hamilton Smith in America and by William Kloen and Daniel Jones in England. The tintype, or ferrotype, process was a variation of the collodion positive, and used a similar process to wet plate photography. A very underexposed negative image was produced on a thin iron plate. It was blackened by painting, lacquering, or enamelling, and coated with a collodion photographic emulsion. The dark background gave the resulting image the appearance of a positive. The ability to utilise a very underexposed image meant that a photographer could prepare, expose, develop, and varnish a tintype plate in just a few minutes. The quick process, along with the durability and inexpensiveness of the medium meant that they quickly replaced collodion positives as the popular ‘instant’ process by photographers. Tintypes were sometimes embellished with hand-tinted colour. Despite the poor quality of the images produced from the tintype process, they were widely popular into the twentieth century. The finished photograph could be given to the customer within minutes and the prices were much lower than those of ambrotypes or daguerreotypes. Tintypes were sometimes placed in protective cases, like those of the daguerreotype and ambrotype, however as they were so much more durable and stable, they were often put in a paper frame or just left as the iron plates. Tintype portraits were first made in formal photography studios, like the earlier types of photographs, but were also made by photographers in booths at fairs, carnivals, or popular tourist destinations.
Material
iron
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1982-026-0076
Date Range From
1857
Date Range To
1900
Length
6.6
Height
9.2
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1857
Date Range To
1910
Material
iron
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Tintype photograph of 3 boys. The middle boy is seated in a chair with his hands in his lap. The two younger boys are standing on either side. The boy on the left is wearing a plaid jacket with striped pants and his hand is on the middle boys shoulder. The youngest boy is on the right. In the background there is a column as well as a patterned fabric. Victorian-era photography studios often featured hand-painted backdrops with architectural features including ornate staircases, columns, and pillars. Nature scenes were also popular. Hand-painted scenic backdrops were popular in portrait photography studios from the 1860s until the 1920s. Tintypes were introduced in the mid 1850s and remained popular into the early 1900s. The process was first described in 1853 by Adolphe-Alexandre Martin, and was later patented in 1857 by Hamilton Smith in America and by William Kloen and Daniel Jones in England. The tintype, or ferrotype, process was a variation of the collodion positive, and used a similar process to wet plate photography. A very underexposed negative image was produced on a thin iron plate. It was blackened by painting, lacquering, or enamelling, and coated with a collodion photographic emulsion. The dark background gave the resulting image the appearance of a positive. The ability to utilise a very underexposed image meant that a photographer could prepare, expose, develop, and varnish a tintype plate in just a few minutes. The quick process, along with the durability and inexpensiveness of the medium meant that they quickly replaced collodion positives as the popular ‘instant’ process by photographers. Tintypes were sometimes embellished with hand-tinted colour. Despite the poor quality of the images produced from the tintype process, they were widely popular into the twentieth century. The finished photograph could be given to the customer within minutes and the prices were much lower than those of ambrotypes or daguerreotypes. Tintypes were sometimes placed in protective cases, like those of the daguerreotype and ambrotype, however as they were so much more durable and stable, they were often put in a paper frame or just left as the iron plates. Tintype portraits were first made in formal photography studios, like the earlier types of photographs, but were also made by photographers in booths at fairs, carnivals, or popular tourist destinations.
Material
iron
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
x2012-001-0295
Date Range From
1857
Date Range To
1910
Length
6.1
Height
10
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Photograh of an unidentified young girl. She is pictured wearing a hat, crocheted jacket, lace skirt, dark stockings, and black boots with white buttons. She is smiling and one hand is brought up to her mouth.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0060
Length
8.5
Height
11.1
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Holler
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Holler
Artist Notes
San Francisco
Description
Photograph of an unidentified child wearing a long white gown and a necklace. The child is standing on a chair that has lace draped over it.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0088
Length
10.8
Height
16.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
R. Rogers
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
R. Rogers
Artist Notes
Tarkio, MO.
Description
Photograph of an unidentified baby wearing a white ribbed shirt and shorts. The baby is seated with their ankles crossed and hands in their lap.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
1992-011-0089
Length
10.9
Height
16.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Charlton
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Artist Name
Charlton
Artist Notes
The photograph was taken by W.F. Charlton, who operated from 1891 until 1907.
Description
Photograph of two unidentified children. On the left is a young girl wearing a dress and on the right is a baby wearing a dress seated on a chair. Photograph taken by Charlton.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifacts
Subject of Image
Child/Youth
Accession Number
x2012-001-0305
Length
10.7
Height
16.4
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
leather, wood, plastic
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
(A) beat up black/brown leather case, green velvet lining (B) brown wooden bowl with ornate brass joiner and broken stem (C) broken off middle part of stem(orange) (D) broken off mouth piece(orange)
Material
leather, wood, plastic
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1978-048-0265A-D
Length
18.50
Width
4.00
Height
6.50
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
Leather, wood
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
(A) Burgundy leather case with blue inside, "JRC" logo on inside. (B) broken wooden bowl with brass joiner. "JRC" imprinted on wooden stem, "?M" and a lion, shield and letter M are stamped on the brass joiner (C) broken orange, triangular stem
Material
Leather, wood
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1978-048-0266A-C
Length
18.50
Width
4.50
Height
6.00
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Case dimensions
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
Leather, wood
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
(A) Black leather case which is broken by the hinge near the bowl opening (B) faded brown bowl with brass connector to a light brown stem "Brewster" and "QUEBEC" are carved into the sides of the stem.
Material
Leather, wood
Condition Information
In good condition.
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1978-048-0267A-B
Length
14.25
Width
3.50
Height
5.00
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
Leather
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
(A) Light brown case with light green suede on the inside "FEC Finest Quality" gold label (B) brown wooden pipe with a broken stand under the bowl, orange plastic stem and mouth piece
Material
Leather
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1978-048-0268A-B
Length
22.00
Width
4.50
Height
8.00
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
plastic
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Corn cob pipe with amber coloured honey comb design stem and amber coloured mouth piece.
Material
plastic
Condition Information
In good condition
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1982-024-0741
Length
16.00
Width
5.00
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Corncob pipe with bamboo stem and mouthpiece.
Condition Information
In good condition.
Category
Personal Artifacts
Sub-category
Personal Gear
Accession Number
1996-003-0031
Length
14.50
Height
5.25
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Measured at widest points.
Images

259961 records – page 1 of 12999.